Delayed measles vaccination of toddlers in Canada: associated socio-demographic factors and parental knowledge attitudes and beliefs.

Tuesday, 9th of January 2018 Print

Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2017 Dec 6:0. doi: 10.1080/21645515.2017.1412899. [Epub ahead of print]

Delayed measles vaccination of toddlers in Canada: associated socio-demographic factors and parental knowledge attitudes and beliefs.

Périnet S12 Kiely M34 De Serres G34 Gilbert NL12.

Author information

1a Centre for Immunization and Respiratory Infectious Diseases Public Health Agency of Canada  130 Colonnade Road AL6501A Ottawa  Ontario K1A 0K9  Canada.

2b Département de médecine sociale et préventive Université de Montréal.

3c Institut national de santé publique du Québec 400 rue dEstimauville Québec  Québec  G1E 7G9.

4d Département de médecine sociale et préventive Université Laval.

Abstract

Delaying vaccination increases the period of vulnerability of children against vaccine-preventable diseases. We used a nationally representative sample of Canadian two-year-old children to explore factors associated with delays in the uptake of the first dose of measles-containing vaccine recommended in Canada for children at 12 months of age. Distribution of delays was determined using data from the 2013 Childhood National Immunization Coverage Survey. Logistic regression was used to examine sociodemographic factors and knowledge attitudes and beliefs (KAB) associated with the two outcomes of interest: delays of one to six months (vaccination at 13 to 18 months of age) and delays of seven to 18 months (vaccination at 19 to 23 months of age). Overall 69% (95% confidence interval [CI] 67-71) of children received their first valid dose on time. Twenty-nine percent (95% CI 27-31) and 11% (95% CI 9-12) of children were unvaccinated before turning 13 and 16 months of age respectively. Factors associated with delays of one to six months were being a girl being born outside Canada and the jurisdiction of residence. Being from a single-parent family being born outside Canada and the jurisdiction of residence were associated with delays of seven to 18 months suggesting that potential barriers might be at play. Associations between KAB and vaccination delays indicate that vaccine hesitancy could contribute to measles vaccination delays in Canada. Barriers in accessing vaccination services and the role of vaccine hesitancy in timely vaccination must be better understood to reduce vaccination delays in toddlers in Canada.

KEYWORDS:

Canada; MMR; children; delays; immunization; measles; timely; vaccination

PMID: 29211621 DOI: 10.1080/21645515.2017.1412899

 

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