Measuring the timeliness of childhood vaccinations: Using cohort data and routine health records to evaluate quality of immunisation services.

Wednesday, 22nd of November 2017 Print

Vaccine. 2017 Nov 10. pii: S0264-410X(17)31493-7. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.10.085. [Epub ahead of print]

Measuring the timeliness of childhood vaccinations: Using cohort data and routine health records to evaluate quality of immunisation services.

Walton S1 Cortina-Borja M1 Dezateux C1 Griffiths LJ1 Tingay K2 Akbari A2 Bandyopadhyay A2 Lyons RA2 Bedford H3.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To achieve full benefits of vaccination programmes high uptake and timely receipt of vaccinations are required.

OBJECTIVES:

To examine uptake and timeliness of infant and pre-school booster vaccines using cohort study data linked to health records.

METHODS:

We included 1782 children born between 2000 and 2001 participating in the Millennium Cohort Study and resident in Wales whose parents gave consent for linkage to National Community Child Health Database records at the age seven year contact. We examined age at receipt timeliness of vaccination (early on-time delayed or never) and intervals between vaccine doses based on the recommended schedule for children at that time of the following vaccines: primary (diphtheria tetanus pertussis (DTP) polio Meningococcal C (Men C) Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)); first dose of measles mumps and rubella (MMR); and pre-school childhood vaccinations (DTP polio MMR). We compared parental report with child health recorded MMR vaccination status at age three years.

RESULTS:

While 94% of children received the first dose of primary vaccines early or on time this was lower for subsequent doses (82% 65% and 88% for second and third doses and pre-school booster respectively). Median intervals between doses exceeded the recommended schedule for all but the first dose with marked variation between children. There was high concordance (97%) between parental reported and child health recorded MMR status.

CONCLUSIONS:

Routine immunisation records provide useful information on timely receipt of vaccines and can be used to assess the quality of childhood vaccination programmes. Parental report of MMR vaccine status is reliable.

KEYWORDS:

Child; Child health systems; Millennium Cohort Study (MCS); Timeliness; Vaccination

 

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