Knowledge Attitudes and Perceptions About Routine Childhood Vaccinations Among Jewish Ultra-Orthodox Mothers Residing in Communities with Low Vaccination Coverage in the Jerusalem District.

Thursday, 19th of January 2017 Print

Matern Child Health J. 2017 Jan 16. doi: 10.1007/s10995-017-2272-5. [Epub ahead of print]

Knowledge Attitudes and Perceptions About Routine Childhood Vaccinations Among Jewish Ultra-Orthodox Mothers Residing in Communities with Low Vaccination Coverage in the Jerusalem District.

Stein Zamir C12 Israeli A3.

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Abstract

Background and aims Childhood vaccinations are an important component of primary prevention. Maternal and Child Health (MCH) clinics in Israel provide routine vaccinations without charge. Several vaccine-preventable-diseases outbreaks (measles mumps) emerged in Jerusalem in the past decade. We aimed to study attitudes and knowledge on vaccinations among mothers in communities with low immunization coverage. Methods A qualitative study including focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Results Low immunization coverage was defined below the districts mean (age 2 years 2013) for measles-mumps-rubella-varicella 1st dose (MMR1MMRV1) and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis 4th dose (DTaP4) 96 and 89% respectively. Five communities were included all were Jewish ultra-orthodox. The mothers (n = 87) median age was 30 years and median number of children 4. Most mothers (94%) rated vaccinations as the main activity in the MCH clinics with overall positive attitudes. Knowledge about vaccines and vaccination schedule was inadequate. Of vaccines scheduled at ages 0-2 years (n = 13) the mean number mentioned was 3.9 ± 2.8 (median 4 range 0-9). Vaccines mentioned more often were outbreak-related (measles mumps polio) and HBV (given to newborns). Concerns about vaccines were obvious trust issues and religious beliefs were not. Vaccination delay was very common and timeliness was considered insignificant. Practical difficulties in adhering to the recommended schedule prevailed. The vaccinations visits were associated with pain and stress. Overall there was a sense of self-responsibility accompanied by inability to influence others. Conclusion Investigating maternal knowledge and attitudes on childhood vaccinations provides insights that may assist in planning tailored intervention programs aimed to increase both vaccination coverage and timeliness.

 

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