AMRIRIA PRONECT/ OPTIMUM AGE FOR MEASLES VACCINATION/ MEASLES IN BERLIN/ IN MEMORIAM, UMARU YAR'ADUA

Friday, 7th of May 2010 Print

AMMRIRIRA PROJECT/ OPTIMUM AGE FOR MEASLES VACCINATION/ MEASLES IN BERLIN/ IN MEMORIAM, UMARU YAR'ADUA

1) Approved Statement on AMMRIRIA Project for Task Force and Partner Websites

For Immediate Release:  April 27, 2010

 Accelerated Measles Mortality Reduction Improving Routine Immunizations in Africa

In sub-Saharan Africa, significant progress has been made in reducing childhood death and illness from vaccine preventable disease.  This is the result of parallel and complementary efforts to increase routine immunization capacity, and to target highly communicable diseases like polio and measles through mass campaign activities. Measles, a leading cause of death in young children, has been on the decline since 2000.  Between 2000-2008 as a result of accelerated measles mortality reduction (AMMR) strategies, measles deaths declined by 78% globally and 92% in Africa.  AMMR activities have also made tremendous capacity contributions to the routine immunization and health delivery systems in developing countries by increasing supply chain, lab, surveillance, and clinical delivery capacities. However this progress has slowed significantly since 2007 and funding for measles control activities has declined.  Sub-Saharan Africa is at risk of losing the substantial gains it has made in measles mortality reduction and in routine immunization delivery capacity. Countries must continue to support routine immunizations while identifying new funding to support AMMR activities. Funding is essential for both routine immunization and supplemental activities in both measles and polio.  Support must be provided for all three activities.

 The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation recently gave funding to the Task Force for Global Health for a collaborative project with the Carter Center - Accelerated Measles Mortality Reduction Improving Routine Immunizations in Africa (AMMRIRIA). Working together, the organizations will request the Elders (www.theelders.org) and leaders in sub-Saharan African countries to mobilize adequate resources for sustaining and extending the progress achieved to date. This effort supports the Measles Initiative, a collaborative partnership established in 2001. The core members of the partnership include:  the American Red Cross (ARC), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the United Nations Foundation (UNF) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

 In February President Carter sent a message to the participants of the Global Measles Management meeting in Geneva, expressing his support of the continued activity of the Measles Partnership. Since that time, President Carter has commended Nigeria’s commitment of national resources in support of accelerated measles mortality reduction activities, and has sent a message to President Joseph Kabila of the Democratic Republic of Congo encouraging continuing commitment of resources in support of routine immunization and supplemental immunization activities.

 Global progress in preventing measles deaths and strengthening the health systems of developing countries relies on cooperation and leadership. President Carter has a long-standing history of working with African leaders to help advance human rights and health and development objectives. Mrs. Carter was co-founder of Every Child By Two, an initiative advocating for childhood immunizations in the United States.

 The project is led by Dr. Alan Hinman, Sr. Public Health Scientist at the Task Force for Global Health. Dr Hinman is a former CDC Assistant Surgeon General where he served as Director of the Immunization Division, Director of the National Center for Prevention Services and Senior Advisor to the Director.

 Contact:
Samantha Kluglein
Communications and Project Manager

Task Force for Global Health

skluglein@taskforce.org
Ph: +! 404-592-1444

 

2)  OPTIMUM AGE FOR ROUTINE MEASLES VACCINATION

 Nine months, most people would say.

 

What about urban areas where measles occurs before 9 months? Is the argument from maternal antibody interference in young vaccinees as strong as hitherto?

 

http://www.technet21.org/forumV3/viewtopic.php?t=1419

 

Cross posted, with thanks, from Technet Forum.

 

3) Spotlight on measles 2010: Preliminary report of an ongoing measles outbreak in a subpopulation with low vaccination coverage in Berlin, Germany, January-March 2010

 

Eurosurveillance, Volume 15, Issue 13, 01 April 2010  

Rapid communications 

 

J Bätzing-Feigenbaum ( )1, U Pruckner2, A Beyer2, G Sinn3, A Dinter4, A Mankertz5, A Siedler6, A Schubert1, M Suckau7

1.     Infectious Disease Protection and Epidemiology Unit, State Office for Health and Social Affairs (LAGeSo), Federal State of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

2.     District Health Office Steglitz-Zehlendorf of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

3.     District Health Office Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

4.     District Health Office Tempelhof-Schöneberg of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

5.     National Reference Centre for Measles, Mumps and Rubella at the Robert Koch-Institute (RKI), Berlin, Germany

6.     Vaccination Unit, Robert Koch-Institute (RKI), Berlin, Germany

7.     Department for Health, Environment and Consumers Protection (SenGUV), Federal State of Berlin, Berlin, Germany


Citation style for this article: Bätzing-Feigenbaum J, Pruckner U, Beyer A, Sinn G, Dinter A, Mankertz A, Siedler A, Schubert A, Suckau M. Spotlight on measles 2010: Preliminary report of an ongoing measles outbreak in a subpopulation with low vaccination coverage in Berlin, Germany, January-March 2010. Euro Surveill. 2010;15(13):pii=19527. Available online: http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=19527
Date of submission: 19 March 2010


ABSTRACT BELOW

FULL TEXT AT http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=19527

Since early January 2010, Berlin has been experiencing a measles outbreak with 62 cases as of 31 March. The index case acquired the infection in India. In recent years, measles incidence in Berlin has been lower than the German average and vaccination coverage in school children has increased since 2001. However, this outbreak involves schools and kindergartens with low vaccination coverage and parents with critical attitudes towards vaccination, which makes the implementation of public health interventions challenging.

 

 

Good reading.

 

Bob Davis

/1) Approved Statement on AMMRIRIA Project for Task Force and Partner Websites

For Immediate Release:  April 27, 2010

 

 Accelerated Measles Mortality Reduction Improving Routine Immunizations in Africa

 

In sub-Saharan Africa, significant progress has been made in reducing childhood death and illness from vaccine preventable disease.  This is the result of parallel and complementary efforts to increase routine immunization capacity, and to target highly communicable diseases like polio and measles through mass campaign activities. Measles, a leading cause of death in young children, has been on the decline since 2000.  Between 2000-2008 as a result of accelerated measles mortality reduction (AMMR) strategies, measles deaths declined by 78% globally and 92% in Africa.  AMMR activities have also made tremendous capacity contributions to the routine immunization and health delivery systems in developing countries by increasing supply chain, lab, surveillance, and clinical delivery capacities. However this progress has slowed significantly since 2007 and funding for measles control activities has declined.  Sub-Saharan Africa is at risk of losing the substantial gains it has made in measles mortality reduction and in routine immunization delivery capacity. Countries must continue to support routine immunizations while identifying new funding to support AMMR activities. Funding is essential for both routine immunization and supplemental activities in both measles and polio.  Support must be provided for all three activities.

 

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation recently gave funding to the Task Force for Global Health for a collaborative project with the Carter Center - Accelerated Measles Mortality Reduction Improving Routine Immunizations in Africa (AMMRIRIA). Working together, the organizations will request the Elders (www.theelders.org) and leaders in sub-Saharan African countries to mobilize adequate resources for sustaining and extending the progress achieved to date. This effort supports the Measles Initiative, a collaborative partnership established in 2001. The core members of the partnership include:  the American Red Cross (ARC), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the United Nations Foundation (UNF) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

 

In February President Carter sent a message to the participants of the Global Measles Management meeting in Geneva, expressing his support of the continued activity of the Measles Partnership. Since that time, President Carter has commended Nigeria’s commitment of national resources in support of accelerated measles mortality reduction activities, and has sent a message to President Joseph Kabila of the Democratic Republic of Congo encouraging continuing commitment of resources in support of routine immunization and supplemental immunization activities.

 

Global progress in preventing measles deaths and strengthening the health systems of developing countries relies on cooperation and leadership. President Carter has a long-standing history of working with African leaders to help advance human rights and health and development objectives. Mrs. Carter was co-founder of Every Child By Two, an initiative advocating for childhood immunizations in the United States.

 

The project is led by Dr. Alan Hinman, Sr. Public Health Scientist at the Task Force for Global Health. Dr Hinman is a former CDC Assistant Surgeon General where he served as Director of the Immunization Division, Director of the National Center for Prevention Services and Senior Advisor to the Director.

 

 

 

Contact:
Samantha Kluglein
Communications and Project Manager

Task Force for Global Health

skluglein@taskforce.org
Ph: +! 404-592-1444

 

###

 

 

 

2)  OPTIMUM AGE FOR ROUTINE MEASLES VACCINATION

 

Nine months, most people would say.

 

What about urban areas where measles occurs before 9 months? Is the argument from maternal antibody interference in young vaccinees as strong as hitherto?

 

http://www.technet21.org/forumV3/viewtopic.php?t=1419

 

Cross posted, with thanks, from Technet Forum.

 

3) Spotlight on measles 2010: Preliminary report of an ongoing measles outbreak in a subpopulation with low vaccination coverage in Berlin, Germany, January-March 2010

 

Eurosurveillance, Volume 15, Issue 13, 01 April 2010  

Rapid communications 

 

J Bätzing-Feigenbaum ( )1, U Pruckner2, A Beyer2, G Sinn3, A Dinter4, A Mankertz5, A Siedler6, A Schubert1, M Suckau7

1.     Infectious Disease Protection and Epidemiology Unit, State Office for Health and Social Affairs (LAGeSo), Federal State of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

2.     District Health Office Steglitz-Zehlendorf of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

3.     District Health Office Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

4.     District Health Office Tempelhof-Schöneberg of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

5.     National Reference Centre for Measles, Mumps and Rubella at the Robert Koch-Institute (RKI), Berlin, Germany

6.     Vaccination Unit, Robert Koch-Institute (RKI), Berlin, Germany

7.     Department for Health, Environment and Consumers Protection (SenGUV), Federal State of Berlin, Berlin, Germany


Citation style for this article: Bätzing-Feigenbaum J, Pruckner U, Beyer A, Sinn G, Dinter A, Mankertz A, Siedler A, Schubert A, Suckau M. Spotlight on measles 2010: Preliminary report of an ongoing measles outbreak in a subpopulation with low vaccination coverage in Berlin, Germany, January-March 2010. Euro Surveill. 2010;15(13):pii=19527. Available online: http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=19527
Date of submission: 19 March 2010


ABSTRACT BELOW

FULL TEXT AT http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=19527

Since early January 2010, Berlin has been experiencing a measles outbreak with 62 cases as of 31 March. The index case acquired the infection in India. In recent years, measles incidence in Berlin has been lower than the German average and vaccination coverage in school children has increased since 2001. However, this outbreak involves schools and kindergartens with low vaccination coverage and parents with critical attitudes towards vaccination, which makes the implementation of public health interventions challenging.

 

 

Good reading.

 

Bob Davis

 

 

1) Approved Statement on AMMRIRIA Project for Task Force and Partner Websites

For Immediate Release:  April 27, 2010

 

 Accelerated Measles Mortality Reduction Improving Routine Immunizations in Africa

 

In sub-Saharan Africa, significant progress has been made in reducing childhood death and illness from vaccine preventable disease.  This is the result of parallel and complementary efforts to increase routine immunization capacity, and to target highly communicable diseases like polio and measles through mass campaign activities. Measles, a leading cause of death in young children, has been on the decline since 2000.  Between 2000-2008 as a result of accelerated measles mortality reduction (AMMR) strategies, measles deaths declined by 78% globally and 92% in Africa.  AMMR activities have also made tremendous capacity contributions to the routine immunization and health delivery systems in developing countries by increasing supply chain, lab, surveillance, and clinical delivery capacities. However this progress has slowed significantly since 2007 and funding for measles control activities has declined.  Sub-Saharan Africa is at risk of losing the substantial gains it has made in measles mortality reduction and in routine immunization delivery capacity. Countries must continue to support routine immunizations while identifying new funding to support AMMR activities. Funding is essential for both routine immunization and supplemental activities in both measles and polio.  Support must be provided for all three activities.

 

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation recently gave funding to the Task Force for Global Health for a collaborative project with the Carter Center - Accelerated Measles Mortality Reduction Improving Routine Immunizations in Africa (AMMRIRIA). Working together, the organizations will request the Elders (www.theelders.org) and leaders in sub-Saharan African countries to mobilize adequate resources for sustaining and extending the progress achieved to date. This effort supports the Measles Initiative, a collaborative partnership established in 2001. The core members of the partnership include:  the American Red Cross (ARC), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the United Nations Foundation (UNF) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

 

In February President Carter sent a message to the participants of the Global Measles Management meeting in Geneva, expressing his support of the continued activity of the Measles Partnership. Since that time, President Carter has commended Nigeria’s commitment of national resources in support of accelerated measles mortality reduction activities, and has sent a message to President Joseph Kabila of the Democratic Republic of Congo encouraging continuing commitment of resources in support of routine immunization and supplemental immunization activities.

 

Global progress in preventing measles deaths and strengthening the health systems of developing countries relies on cooperation and leadership. President Carter has a long-standing history of working with African leaders to help advance human rights and health and development objectives. Mrs. Carter was co-founder of Every Child By Two, an initiative advocating for childhood immunizations in the United States.

 

The project is led by Dr. Alan Hinman, Sr. Public Health Scientist at the Task Force for Global Health. Dr Hinman is a former CDC Assistant Surgeon General where he served as Director of the Immunization Division, Director of the National Center for Prevention Services and Senior Advisor to the Director.

 

 

 

Contact:
Samantha Kluglein
Communications and Project Manager

Task Force for Global Health

skluglein@taskforce.org
Ph: +! 404-592-1444

 

###

 

 

 

2)  OPTIMUM AGE FOR ROUTINE MEASLES VACCINATION

 

Nine months, most people would say.

 

What about urban areas where measles occurs before 9 months? Is the argument from maternal antibody interference in young vaccinees as strong as hitherto?

 

http://www.technet21.org/forumV3/viewtopic.php?t=1419

 

Cross posted, with thanks, from Technet Forum.

 

3) Spotlight on measles 2010: Preliminary report of an ongoing measles outbreak in a subpopulation with low vaccination coverage in Berlin, Germany, January-March 2010

 

Eurosurveillance, Volume 15, Issue 13, 01 April 2010  

Rapid communications 

 

J Bätzing-Feigenbaum ( )1, U Pruckner2, A Beyer2, G Sinn3, A Dinter4, A Mankertz5, A Siedler6, A Schubert1, M Suckau7

1.     Infectious Disease Protection and Epidemiology Unit, State Office for Health and Social Affairs (LAGeSo), Federal State of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

2.     District Health Office Steglitz-Zehlendorf of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

3.     District Health Office Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

4.     District Health Office Tempelhof-Schöneberg of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

5.     National Reference Centre for Measles, Mumps and Rubella at the Robert Koch-Institute (RKI), Berlin, Germany

6.     Vaccination Unit, Robert Koch-Institute (RKI), Berlin, Germany

7.     Department for Health, Environment and Consumers Protection (SenGUV), Federal State of Berlin, Berlin, Germany


Citation style for this article: Bätzing-Feigenbaum J, Pruckner U, Beyer A, Sinn G, Dinter A, Mankertz A, Siedler A, Schubert A, Suckau M. Spotlight on measles 2010: Preliminary report of an ongoing measles outbreak in a subpopulation with low vaccination coverage in Berlin, Germany, January-March 2010. Euro Surveill. 2010;15(13):pii=19527. Available online: http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=19527
Date of submission: 19 March 2010


ABSTRACT BELOW

FULL TEXT AT http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=19527

Since early January 2010, Berlin has been experiencing a measles outbreak with 62 cases as of 31 March. The index case acquired the infection in India. In recent years, measles incidence in Berlin has been lower than the German average and vaccination coverage in school children has increased since 2001. However, this outbreak involves schools and kindergartens with low vaccination coverage and parents with critical attitudes towards vaccination, which makes the implementation of public health interventions challenging.

 

 

Good reading.

 

Bob Davis

 

  

1) Approved Statement on AMMRIRIA Project for Task Force and Partner Websites

For Immediate Release:  April 27, 2010

  Accelerated Measles Mortality Reduction Improving Routine Immunizations in Africa

In sub-Saharan Africa, significant progress has been made in reducing childhood death and illness from vaccine preventable disease.  This is the result of parallel and complementary efforts to increase routine immunization capacity, and to target highly communicable diseases like polio and measles through mass campaign activities. Measles, a leading cause of death in young children, has been on the decline since 2000.  Between 2000-2008 as a result of accelerated measles mortality reduction (AMMR) strategies, measles deaths declined by 78% globally and 92% in Africa.  AMMR activities have also made tremendous capacity contributions to the routine immunization and health delivery systems in developing countries by increasing supply chain, lab, surveillance, and clinical delivery capacities. However this progress has slowed significantly since 2007 and funding for measles control activities has declined.  Sub-Saharan Africa is at risk of losing the substantial gains it has made in measles mortality reduction and in routine immunization delivery capacity. Countries must continue to support routine immunizations while identifying new funding to support AMMR activities. Funding is essential for both routine immunization and supplemental activities in both measles and polio.  Support must be provided for all three activities.

 

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation recently gave funding to the Task Force for Global Health for a collaborative project with the Carter Center - Accelerated Measles Mortality Reduction Improving Routine Immunizations in Africa (AMMRIRIA). Working together, the organizations will request the Elders (www.theelders.org) and leaders in sub-Saharan African countries to mobilize adequate resources for sustaining and extending the progress achieved to date. This effort supports the Measles Initiative, a collaborative partnership established in 2001. The core members of the partnership include:  the American Red Cross (ARC), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the United Nations Foundation (UNF) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

 

In February President Carter sent a message to the participants of the Global Measles Management meeting in Geneva, expressing his support of the continued activity of the Measles Partnership. Since that time, President Carter has commended Nigeria’s commitment of national resources in support of accelerated measles mortality reduction activities, and has sent a message to President Joseph Kabila of the Democratic Republic of Congo encouraging continuing commitment of resources in support of routine immunization and supplemental immunization activities.

 

Global progress in preventing measles deaths and strengthening the health systems of developing countries relies on cooperation and leadership. President Carter has a long-standing history of working with African leaders to help advance human rights and health and development objectives. Mrs. Carter was co-founder of Every Child By Two, an initiative advocating for childhood immunizations in the United States.

 

The project is led by Dr. Alan Hinman, Sr. Public Health Scientist at the Task Force for Global Health. Dr Hinman is a former CDC Assistant Surgeon General where he served as Director of the Immunization Division, Director of the National Center for Prevention Services and Senior Advisor to the Director.

 

 

 

Contact:
Samantha Kluglein
Communications and Project Manager

Task Force for Global Health

skluglein@taskforce.org
Ph: +! 404-592-1444

 

 

2)  OPTIMUM AGE FOR ROUTINE MEASLES VACCINATION

 

Nine months, most people would say.

 

What about urban areas where measles occurs before 9 months? Is the argument from maternal antibody interference in young vaccinees as strong as hitherto?

 

http://www.technet21.org/forumV3/viewtopic.php?t=1419

 

Cross posted, with thanks, from Technet Forum.

 

3) Spotlight on measles 2010: Preliminary report of an ongoing measles outbreak in a subpopulation with low vaccination coverage in Berlin, Germany, January-March 2010

 

Eurosurveillance, Volume 15, Issue 13, 01 April 2010  

Rapid communications 

 

J Bätzing-Feigenbaum ( )1, U Pruckner2, A Beyer2, G Sinn3, A Dinter4, A Mankertz5, A Siedler6, A Schubert1, M Suckau7

1.     Infectious Disease Protection and Epidemiology Unit, State Office for Health and Social Affairs (LAGeSo), Federal State of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

2.     District Health Office Steglitz-Zehlendorf of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

3.     District Health Office Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

4.     District Health Office Tempelhof-Schöneberg of Berlin, Berlin, Germany

5.     National Reference Centre for Measles, Mumps and Rubella at the Robert Koch-Institute (RKI), Berlin, Germany

6.     Vaccination Unit, Robert Koch-Institute (RKI), Berlin, Germany

7.     Department for Health, Environment and Consumers Protection (SenGUV), Federal State of Berlin, Berlin, Germany


Citation style for this article: Bätzing-Feigenbaum J, Pruckner U, Beyer A, Sinn G, Dinter A, Mankertz A, Siedler A, Schubert A, Suckau M. Spotlight on measles 2010: Preliminary report of an ongoing measles outbreak in a subpopulation with low vaccination coverage in Berlin, Germany, January-March 2010. Euro Surveill. 2010;15(13):pii=19527. Available online: http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=19527
Date of submission: 19 March 2010


ABSTRACT BELOW

FULL TEXT AT http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=19527

Since early January 2010, Berlin has been experiencing a measles outbreak with 62 cases as of 31 March. The index case acquired the infection in India. In recent years, measles incidence in Berlin has been lower than the German average and vaccination coverage in school children has increased since 2001. However, this outbreak involves schools and kindergartens with low vaccination coverage and parents with critical attitudes towards vaccination, which makes the implementation of public health interventions challenging.

 

 

Good reading.

 

Bob Davis

 

IN MEMORIAM, UMARU YAR'ADUA

 

In previous updates, I have remembered great managers and academicians in public health. Today, I do the same for Umaru Yar'Adua, late president of Nigeria.

 

Both as governor of Katsina State and, later, as President of Nigeria, Yar'Adua was a strong champion of polio eradication. It was he who, in 2009, summoned every state governor in Nigeria to Abuja, there to sign the Abuja Commitments to polio eradication and EPI.  The results of that political commitment are clear from Nigeria's polio data:

 

WILD POLIOVIRUS CASES, NIGERIA FIRST 4 MONTHS OF 2009 AND 2010

 

January-April 2009                        236 cases

January-April 2010                        2 cases

 

Here, for those not already familiar with it, is the text of the Abuja Commitment.

 

ABUJA COMMITMENT TO POLIO ERADICATION IN NIGERIA

A Communique following the meeting of governors with Mr. Bill Gates

02 February 2009

 

We, the Executive Governors of the thirty-six (36) States of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, meeting in Abuja, with Mr. Bill Gates, on 2nd February 2009 at a special session on health convened under the leadership of His Excellency, Umaru Musa Yar’Adua, President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

Bearing in mind our constitutional responsibilities and our strong desire to have a health population, and our duty to protect our children from all childhood diseases, including polio and other vaccine preventable diseases and an international commitment to a world-free polio.

Noting with concern that in the world today, only Nigerian children are being exposed to all three types of Poliovirus that can cause life-long paralysis, and more Nigerian children are paralyzed from Polio than in any other county in the world.

Acknowledge that the eradication of polio is, therefore, an urgent health priority for our States, and our Nation and the successful completion of Polio eradication in Nigeria will enhance the Government’s capacity and support for delivering other vital health services.

 Recognizing that;

§  There must be universal coverage for all Nigerians 

§  Polio in itself is symptomatic of a failing primary health care system 

§  That a viable Primary Health Care system is the sustainable platform for Routine Immunization in Nigeria 

§  90% of all children will have to be reached and vaccinated to stop the sustained transmission of Polio 

§  Completion of Polio eradication will require strong leadership from the State and LGA administrations and strategic guidance from the State Health officials 

§  Oral Polio Vaccines used in Nigeria are safe and effective and similar to those used in countries that have eradicated polio 

§  Valuable technical and financial support from WHO, UNICEF, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Rotary International and other development partners will assist in the strengthening eradication activities and routine immunization in the States

The Initiative by Niger state Government to legislate against polio immunization should be shared with other states for consideration.

Noting that under our (Governors) leadership we can secure the historic achievement of a polio-free Nigeria, expedite the delivery of a polio-free Africa, and protect the lives of millions of children for all future generations.

 

We COMMIT OURSELVES to:

1.         Providing active leadership of Polio eradication activities (including routine immunization) and primary health care, in general, in the State and directing LGA Chairmen to ensure that all children under 5 years are reached and vaccinated during any polio eradication activity in the State;

2.         Improving the potential quality at the LGA level in our States by Chairing quarterly meetings with all the LGA Chairmen to closely review the planning, implementation and results of polio eradication activities, routine immunization/primary health care and identify remedies for poor-performing LGAs;

3.         Allocating additional financial and human resources to strengthen Primary Health Care so that it can sustain routine immunization services and improve implementation of campaigns (Immunization Plus Days) in the State;

4.         Reporting back to H.E. the President through NEC on quarterly basis on the status of polio eradication efforts, including routine immunization, in the State.

5.         Improving Primary Health Care as a more holistic plan to addressing the issue of immunization through community health insurance schemes. 

Signed at Abuja, Nigeria on 2nd February in the Year 2009

 

 

DR. BUKOLA SARAKI                                          PROF. BABATUNDE OSOTIMEHIN

CHAIRMAN, GOVERNORS FORUM &                    HON MINISTER FOR HEALTH              EXECUTIVE GOVERNOR OF KWARA STATE

 

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